Spinning Black Hole Sprays Light-Speed Plasma Clouds Into Space (April 2019) - ICRAR

Spinning Black Hole Sprays Light-Speed Plasma Clouds Into Space

The multimedia on this page was created for the press release 'Spinning Black Hole Sprays Light-Speed Plasma Clouds Into Space' from April 2019. 

All images are free to be used non-commercially with the credit at the end of the caption. 

Videos are free to be embedded using the Vimeo embed code provided. For other video uses please contact us via communications@icrar.org.

Images can be downloaded using the link to Dropbox below, or individually via clicking the required image and downloading via the icon on the bottom right. 

Images

  • V404 Cygni

    Artist's impression of the black hole X-ray binary system V404 Cygni as seen from a distance. Bright spots in the jets are detected by our high angular resolution radio imaging, and move away from the black hole in different directions. Credit: ICRAR

  • V404 Cygni System Close Up

    Artist's impression of V404 Cygni seen close up. The binary star system consists of a normal star in orbit with a black hole. Material from the star falls towards the black hole and spirals inwards in an accretion disk, with powerful jets being launched from the inner regions close to the black hole. Credit: ICRAR

  • V404 Cygni Jets

    Artist's impression of the V404 Cygni black hole X-ray binary system. The jets launched from the inner part of the system move in different directions at different times, generating a corkscrew-shaped pattern as they swing around. We do not have the resolution to be able to make out this structure, and see only the brightest clouds of plasma as they move outwards. Credit: ICRAR

  • V404 Cygni Accretion Disk and Jet

    Artist's impression of the accretion disk around the black hole. During a powerful outburst in 2015, intense radiation caused the inner few thousand kilometres of the accretion disk to “puff up” into a doughnut-shaped structure. Credit: ICRAR

  • Accretion Disk

    Artist's impression of the inner parts of the accretion disk in V404 Cygni. The black hole rotates about a different axis to the binary orbit. As the spinning black hole drags spacetime around with it, the puffed-up inner accretion disk wobbles around like a spinning top. The jets launched from the innermost parts of the flow are redirected, either by the puffed-up inner disk or the strong winds being driven off it by the intense radiation. Credit: ICRAR

  • Jet Ejections

    Artist's impression of jet ejections in V404 Cygni. With our radio telescopes, we see individual bright clouds of plasma that have been ejected from the innermost regions, and redirected by the puffed-up inner accretion disk. Credit: ICRAR

  • Disk Cross Section

    Artist's impression showing a cross section of the accretion disk in V404 Cygni. The precessing, puffed-up region of the disk is only a few thousand kilometres wide, as compared to a total disk size of about 10 million kilometres. The disk is hottest in its inner regions, and becomes cooler and thicker further out. Credit: ICRAR

  • Nature Cover Art Submission

    Schematic artist’s impression of the changing jet orientation in V404 Cygni. Each segment (as separated by the clock hands) shows the jets at a different time, oriented in different directions as seen in our high angular resolution radio imaging. Credit: ICRAR

  • Frame Dragging

    Artist's impression of twisted space-time around the spinning black hole. The black hole is so dense that it creates a rupture in the very fabric of space time, seen here as the infinitely deep well in the centre. As the black hole spins, it drags spacetime around with it, giving rise to the twisting of the spacetime grid shown here. This leads to the precession of the inner puffed-up accretion disk. Credit: ICRAR

Videos

Narrated V404 Cygni Black Hole Animation

An animation of the precessing jets and accretion flow in V404 Cygni narrated by Associate Professor James Miller-Jones of Curtin University and ICRAR. Zooming in from the high-speed plasma clouds observed with our radio telescope, we see the binary system itself. Mass from the star spirals in towards the black hole via an accretion disk, whose inner regions are puffed up by intense radiation. The spinning black hole pulls spacetime (the green gridlines) around with it, causing the inner disk to precess like a spinning top, redirecting the jets as it does so. Credit: ICRAR

Video embed code available here. 

V404 Cygni Black Hole Jets Simulation

Movie made from our high-resolution radio images taken on 22nd June, 2015 with the National Science Foundation’s Very Long Baseline Array. It shows clouds of plasma in the precessing jets moving away from the black hole in different directions. The scale of the images is approximately the size of our Solar System, and time is shown by the clock. Credit: ICRAR and the University of Alberta

Video embed code available here. 

V404 Cygni Black Hole Animation (no narration)

Animation of the precessing jets and accretion flow in V404 Cygni. Zooming in from the high-speed plasma clouds observed with our radio telescope, we see the binary system itself. Mass from the star spirals in towards the black hole via an accretion disk, whose inner regions are puffed up by intense radiation. The spinning black hole pulls spacetime (the green gridlines) around with it, causing the inner disk to precess like a spinning top, redirecting the jets as it does so. Credit: ICRAR

Video embed code available here

V404 Cygni Black Hole Animation (No narration and no labels)

This version of the animation without narration and labels is available to broadcast media on request

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